A Word on the Equality Act


by Matthew C. Harrison 

The words of the apostle Peter apply to us now:

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! According to his great mercy, he has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in heaven for you, who by God’s power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith — more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire — may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ. Though you have not seen him, you love him. Though you do not now see him, you believe in him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory. (1 Peter 1:3–8)

The church’s task is not political. It is the proclamation of the Gospel of free salvation in the cross and resurrection of Jesus for all (1 Cor. 1:23; John 18:36). “The Church is the congregation of saints in which the Gospel is purely taught and the Sacraments are correctly administered” (AC VII 1).[1]

God rules His church by His infallible Word, the Holy Scriptures (John 17:17; 2 Tim. 3:15–16). God rules the state by His eternal law, reason and reasonable laws for the common welfare. “Our churches teach that lawful civil regulations are good works of God” (AC XVI 1; see Rom. 13:1–7). The church should not meddle in government affairs, especially in matters upon which the Word of God is silent. It is also wrong when governments act against God’s eternal law, reason and the basic civil rights of all people. The First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution enshrines this truth. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Throughout history, governments have often acted unjustly — sometimes in the name of race, atheism, communism, religion and even Christianity — and curtailed or denied the rights of conscience and the free exercise of religion. And governments continue to do so. Our Lutheran and biblical confession is that “it is necessary for Christians to be obedient to their rulers and laws. The only exception is when they are commanded to sin. Then they ought to obey God rather than men (Acts 5:29)” (AC XVI 6–7; see 1 Peter 2:13–14).

St. Paul made use of his legal right as a Roman citizen (“I appeal to Caesar” Acts 25:11). “Christ’s kingdom allows us outwardly to use legitimate political ordinances of every nation in which we live, just as it allows us to use medicine or the art of building, or food, drink, and air” (Ap XVI 54). Our Lutheran Confessions even commend the seeking of public remedy for injustice: “Public remedy, made through the office of the public official, is not condemned, but is commanded and is God’s work, according to Paul (Romans 13)” (Ap XVI 59). Our God-given right to act as citizens is very important, especially now.

The Equality Act is before Congress. It sounds innocent. All Americans should enjoy equality and the protections of the U.S. Constitution. But in elevating sexual orientation to a protected class, the Equality Act will bring sweeping changes to current laws, to the great detriment of the religious and constitutional freedoms of biblically faithful churches, institutions, Christian schools and individuals.

Jesus referred to Genesis 2:24, when He stated:

“Have you not read that he who created them from the beginning made them male and female, and said, ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh’? So they are no longer two but one flesh. What therefore God has joined together, let not man separate.” (Matt. 19:4–6)

In fact, those churches and institutions that are bound by the Word of God to the truth of marriage between a man and a woman, and that sex outside of that institution is contrary to the word of Christ and the apostles in the New Testament (1 Cor. 7:2), could be punished for simply standing on our consistent, ancient Christian beliefs. The Equality Act effectively outlaws the words of Christ, the sublime doctrine of Creation, the First Article of the Creed, and our “free exercise of religion” based upon the Bible and Apostles’ Creed. The biblical teaching that marriage is between a man and a woman is to be labeled forever a mere “sex-based stereotype.”

Martin Luther once said, “Christ dwells only in sinners.” We recognize ourselves as sinners constantly in need of Christ’s forgiveness. We recognize the truth of the apostle Peter’s words, “For it is time for judgment to begin at the household of God” (1 Peter 4:17). We know that Jesus’ opponents grumbled against Him by saying, “This man receives sinners and eats with them” (Luke 15:2). This comforting verse applies to us sinners, and we welcome all others to join us at the feet of Jesus, the sole Savior of all (John 3:16). As Christians, we believe that God has created all people, and all are infinitely valuable and accountable to Him. As Christian citizens, we recognize and demand basic God-given civil rights for all people, even as we insist on the First Amendment rights of Christians.

No matter the course of this or any legislation, Christ will sustain His Church. Our hope is not in laws, Congress or courts. Our hope is Christ. “And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age” (Matt. 28:20).

The letter was excerpted from “A Word on the Equality Act: To the Pastors, Called Workers and Members of the 6,000 Congregations of The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod.”


–Pastor Harrison

[1] Citations from the Augsburg Confession (AC) and the Apology of the Augsburg Confession (Ap) are from Paul T. McCain et al., eds., Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions, 2nd ed. (St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 2005).

6 thoughts on “A Word on the Equality Act”

  1. Amanda Uhlmansiek

    “the church should not meddle in government affairs” – No one is worried about the church meddling in the affairs of state when the church willingly closed up and made no stand at all in the face of the blatant override of our first amendment rights. The LCMS had the opportunity to be a shining light encouraging those to keep their churches open.

  2. Roland Walkenhorst

    All rights boil down to property rights. You own yourself and you own your stuff. This has to be the standard in the temporal world. If we say that everything belongs to God, what do I do when the guy stealing my car tells me it belongs to God, and God told him it was his turn to use it?
    No person should be forced to trade or associate with someone against his will, no matter how repugnant the reasons might be to us. This “equality” thing crawled out of the sewer of politics long ago, and it amounts to an assault on property rights. It guarantees never-ending political fighting.
    Don’t be surprised that the government forces you to provide a service that goes against your Christian beliefs when you have remained silent or even cheered as business owners – for 60 years – have been told in the name of equality what they can and can’t do with their own property.

  3. LaFon Johnson

    Great article,
    I very much appreciate this part “The church should not meddle in government affairs, especially in matters upon which the Word of God is silent. It is also wrong when governments act against God’s eternal law”
    I firmly agree with you the church should not meddle in government affairs and vice versa. It feels this something many people forget or don’t agree that church and state should be separate. So thank you again. Reading has reminded me why I’ve stayed a Lutheran all these years.

  4. John J. Flanagan

    May the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod always stand on scripture even as the culture enacts laws to assault the word of God, and demonize His followers. We have entered a dark era of American history, when religious freedom is under attack. No doubt some churches and denominations have already been compromised and ceased to be a light on the hill. Remaining faithful will come at a cost, but it is the only way for the true Christian church. The LCMS may well become a target for the enemies of God, and it may have to walk through the fires of persecution. May we remain faithful ourselves. Come quickly Lord Jesus.

  5. Raymond D'Amore

    The Equality Act is before Congress. It sounds innocent. All Americans should enjoy equality and the protections of the U.S. Constitution. But in elevating sexual orientation to a protected class, the Equality Act will bring sweeping changes to current laws, to the great detriment of the religious and constitutional freedoms of biblically faithful churches, institutions, Christian schools and individuals.

    Thanks for bringing this to light. But from what I’ve seen it will take a miracle for the average pastor to make one direct comment on what is going on in our country; especially since Nov 3rd. As someone just noted “When I look at news laws, these Satan shoes, the attacks on Dr. Suess, attacks on those who go to Church or Covid no Church gatherings it is if everything Satanic has been sanctioned and released. Do you see the same trend or it is just me?” Many pastors see but have no voice; wouldn’t want to upset some of the congregation.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top